Montreuil-ser-Mur, France 2016 ๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ท

Travelled : 64 kilometres from Montreuil-sur-Mer to Doullens in northern France.

Visited : The Citadelle of Montreuil-sur-Mer and the Abbey Church of Saint-Saulve

Stayed : Doullens municipal Aire, free but water and electricity โ‚ฌ2 N50.15392  E02.34240


After yesterday’s day of travel we plan for a more leasurely day.  Firstly with a walk around Montreuil-sur-Mer, which we will refer to as Montreuil and give the sur-Mer the slip for the rest of this blog.  It was only as we drove in yesterday evening that we notice the town was walled as a Citadel or fortress that we started to investigate it’s past.



Originally Montreuil was a coastal port, long ago stranded by silting of the River Canche, it now 13 kilometres inland.  Another interesting feature was Montreuil was the scene of much of the action in Victor Hugo’s ‘Les Miserables’.  Up at reasonable time we make our way up town to explore.


Pam looking particularly stylish at the entrance to the Citadel. Built around a 13th century castle, the Citadel was built in 1567 and extended several times over the years until it lost its military importance after WW1
Not the most exciting photo but just so you can get the feel.
The views from the ramparts and bastions are very pretty. It’s mid-summer in France and there is a rich green everywhere. The old Chapel is in the centre of the picture.
Deep under the Citadel are the rib-vaulted casements. They currently house a photo exhibition of the WW1 particularly the Battle of the Somme. There are a number of photos of Australian troops on display.  Interestingly these casements provided a communication centre for Field Marshall Haig’s operations in the Somme.  Pam insisted I get a photo with my time-travel twin.
Is Pam trying to tell me something ?
Not many French towns fly a English flag every day and have a statue of Haig in the town square.
The entrance to the Abbey Churh of Saint-Sauve (12th century)
Whilst not in Cathedral proportion Saint-Saulve has a complex series of roof vaulting. It’s very French, the wooden chairs with cane inserts. Distinctly Catholic in its feel.
Just a random picture of a small jardin (park) we noticed while walking the ramparts back to the Hymer.

It is almost mid-day as we return to the Hymer, give it the usual service and prepare to continue our journey.  We continue our journey east into the Somme.  We stay off the motorways and take a leasurely path along the D roads.  There is little traffic as the French nap from 12-2pm.  It’s only an hours drive and we roll into Doullens.  We have the co-ordinates for the Aire and drive in to find it empty and some shade.  Pam prepares lunch on a traditional baguette, we do a few emails and have a camper car nap as you do.

Doullens does not make the lonely planet, but we wander about in the late afternoon and take in the place.



The ruins of the Church of Saint Pierre in Doullens. Not sure when but it looks like a fire to me.
The Hotel De Ville or Town Hall in Doullens, very grand.
This tower and complex is being used as a theatre.

Michael and Pam


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