Michael and Pam's Travels Our European Motorhome Adventures and other Travels

Gallipoli and Anzac. 2015 🇹🇷

Travelled: 65 klm from Eceabat, around the Gallipoli Peninsula
Visited: Anzac and Helles
Stayed: Hotel Klum (campsite) all service TL60  N40.15905, E26.24745
Budget: €89 per day at last check before entering a Turkey. Given the TL we will re-calculate on exiting Turkey


It’s coffee and fruit for breakfast, whilst looking out at the Dardanelles this morning.  There seems to be an endless line of tankers, freighters and ferries passing by. We fuel up again this morning.  Standard diesel is TL3.5 per litre and premium TL3.9.  As we use premium if we can get it, that’s around A$2 per litre.  We follow the signs for ‘Anzak Kove’ and soon find ourselves on the western side of the peninsula.  After turning north and travelling a few kilometres we pass a series of small monuments and signs with familiar names, the area opens slightly and we stop at the Anzac Commemorative site.  Looking around the area looks familiar, the Sphinx and Plugge’s Plateau hang overhead.  Pam asks how did they fit 15,000 people in here for the centenary ?


Center map

The Hymer got us here without missing a beat.
The Hymer got us here without missing a beat.
I have always wanted to visit Anzac and with Pam's support we have made it
I have always wanted to visit Anzac and with Pam’s support we have made it
The Sphinx stands out in the early morning sun.
The Sphinx stands out in the early morning sun.
Graves of some of those Lighthorseman killed in the infamous charge made famous in Peter Weir's film
Graves of some of those Lighthorseman killed in the infamous charge depicted in Peter Weir’s film Gallipoli
Anzac Cove, with the erosion and the new road, it cannot be walked without wet feet.
Anzac Cove, between the erosion at the beachfront and the new road above, it cannot be walked without wet feet.

We spend the next few hours following the walking tour from Mat McLachlan’s Gallipoli Edition, ‘Walking with the Anzacs’.  In brief we visited the cemeteries along the lower section of the walk, the beach on Anzac Cove before walking up to Shrapnel Gulley and Plugge’s Peak cemetery on the ridge above Anzac.  We stopped and read sections of the book at various points, searched for noted graves.  It’s a hard walk up Plugge’s but the view of Anzac, North Beach and on to Suvla Bay makes it well worth the effort.


Anzac, North Beach and Suvla in the distance. From the top of Plugge's Plateau.
Anzac, North Beach and Suvla in the distance. From the top of Plugge’s Plateau.
Plugge's Plateau Cemetery.
Plugge’s Plateau Cemetery.
According to the book the most visited grave on Anzac.
According to the book the most visited grave on Anzac.
Beach Cemetery.
Beach Cemetery.

Our afternoon was a drive south to the Helles Memorial at the southern tip of the Gallipoli Peninsula. A late lunch overlooking the Turkish forts and some of the English cemeteries. We find a campsite and it’s time for a little rest.


Pam gets a little testy if she doesn't get her morning coffee.
Pam gets a little testy, if she doesn’t get her morning coffee.

Michael and Pam


How interesting was this post?

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating 0 / 5. Vote count: 0

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

4 thoughts on “Gallipoli and Anzac. 2015 🇹🇷”